Patrol. Protect. Prepare. Become a Water Watcher!

May is National Water Safety month and we are here to help keep you and your children safe! In April, SNHD released our new drowning prevention campaign, “Be a Water Watcher”.  This encourages adults to be vigilant and always designate a water watcher when children are in or around water.  Being a water watcher means focusing on the three P’s, “Patrol, Protect, and Prepare”.  The data shows that the number one preventative measure is constant supervision which lands under, “Patrol”.

-Always designate an adult to actively watch children in the water.
-Most tragedies occur in seconds, the time it takes to answer your phone.
-Do not drink alcohol while supervising children in and around water.

When it comes to pool safety there are many layers of protection that should always be implemented.  Designating a water watcher is just one of those layers. Click on the American Red Cross link to see other layers of protection that can help save a child’s life!

Be sugar savy this summer! Drink more water.

What are sugar-sweetened beverages (SSBs)? Sugar-sweetened beverages are beverages that contain added sugars and include popular drinks such as:

• Soft drinks/soda pop/ soda
• Fruit drinks, punches, or “-ades”
• Sports drinks
• Tea and Coffee drinks
• Energy drinks
• Sweetened/Flavored milks

What’s the problem with sugar-sweetened beverages?

• Sugar-sweetened beverages (SSBs) including non-diet sodas, energy drinks, and fruit drinks have been associated with obesity, and obesity-related illnesses.
• Nevada has the second highest prevalence of fruit drink consumption among persons aged 18-34 years and is the highest prevalence of African-Americans and     Hispanics who consume fruit-drinks on a regular basis.
• Children and adolescents are major consumers of sugar-sweetened beverages and this consumption has been associated with the rising levels of childhood      obesity.
• Calories from liquid beverages contribute to weight gain at higher levels than solids foods do, and also lack comparable nutrient content when compared to     calories consumed from solid foods.
• Sugar-sweetened beverages are the largest source of added sugar to the American diet.
• Several health conditions have been linked to consumption of excess SSB’s including diabetes, dental carries, and cardiovascular disease.

Healthy Alternatives:

• Water: Try water infused with added citrus or sliced cucumbers.
• 100% Vegetable Juice: Packed with flavor; high in vitamins C, A, and potassium and around 50 calories per cup. If possible choose the low sodium versions.
• Non-fat or low-fat milk: High in calcium and protein—and you need both. You could also try soy milk, rice milk or almond milk.
• Light yogurt and fruit smoothie: Creamy and sweet, high in calcium and only about 170 calories per cup.
• Tea, unsweetened: Get a boost on less than five calories per cup, plus it’s high in antioxidants

For more information concerning sugar-sweetened beverages & to find other delicious drink recipes, please visit our website at: http://www.gethealthyclarkcounty.org/eat-better/sugar-sweetened-beverages.php

May is National Stroke Awareness Month

A stroke can happen to anyone, at any time, at any age. It is important to know what the symptoms are and what to do if you spot them. A stroke occurs when blood flow to an area of the brain is restricted because it is blocked by a clot. The brain cells deprived of blood flow begin to die because there is no oxygen and nutrients to the area needed to survive.
There are two types of stroke. The most common type of stroke, called ischemic, is caused by a blood clot that blocks or plugs a blood vessel in the brain.  The second type of stroke, called hemorrhagic, occurs when a blood vessel in the brain ruptures. Hemorrhagic stroke is commonly caused by high blood pressure and brain aneurysms.
Use the letters FAST to spot stroke signs and know when to call 911.
F – Face Drooping. Is one side of the face drooping or feel numb?
A – Arm weakness. Does the suddenly drift downward on one side of the body?
S – Speech. Trouble speaking or slurred speech? Unable to speak or hard to understand?
T – Time counts. Notice any of these warning signs? If so, call 9-1-1 immediately, even if the symptoms go away.

Unsure if it’s a stroke?? Call 911 anyway! Don’t wait! Sometimes other symptoms, beyond FAST appear like, numbness, confusion, trouble seeing or walking and severe headache.
 
Want to learn more about stroke?
•Talk to your healthcare provider about your personal risk factor for having a stroke.
•If you or someone you know is a stroke survivor, local support groups are available.

Check out these support groups and educational groups in our local area:

Mountain View Hospital
Diagnosis, treatment, education and outreach
Program serves patients, caregivers, and families
When: First Tuesday of every month from 2:00pm-3:00pm
Location: Mountain View H2U Office Suite 114
For more information, call (702) 233-5474

Spring Valley Hospital
Learn about life after a stroke from survivors and experts.
When: Third Friday of each month from 11 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.
Location: Use the main entrance of the hospital and follow the signage for the Stroke Support Group
For more information, call 702-853-3162.

Did you Know?
•Stroke is the fourth leading cause of death and disability nationwide and fifth in Nevada.
•On average, every 40 seconds someone in the United States has a stroke.
•Stroke can happen to anyone, at any age. An estimated, 80% of strokes are preventable by taking small steps to reduce personal risk.
•The risk of having a stroke increases each decade in people over the age of 55.
•To reduce your risk for stroke make simple lifestyle changes by; maintain a healthy diet, manage blood pressure, maintain a healthy weight, get physically active, lower cholesterol, reduce blood sugar and don’t smoke.
•Stroke is treatable. If you or someone you know was having a stroke.

Be a Water Watcher-PATROL

May is National Water Safety month and we are here to help keep you and your children safe! In April, SNHD released our new drowning prevention campaign, “Be a Water Watcher”.  This encourages adults to be vigilant and always designate a water watcher when children are in or around water.  Being a water watcher means focusing on the three P’s, “Patrol, Protect, and Prepare”.  The data shows that the number one preventative measure is constant supervision which lands under, “Patrol”.

-Always designate an adult to actively watch children in the water.
-Most tragedies occur in seconds, the time it takes to answer your phone.
-Do not drink alcohol while supervising children in and around water.

When it comes to pool safety there are many layers of protection that should always be implemented.  Designating a water watcher is just one of those layers. Click on the American Red Cross to see other layers of protection that can help save a child’s life!

Risk Factors for Diabetes

The American Diabetes Association recommends that testing to detect pre-diabetes and type 2 diabetes be considered in adults without symptoms who are overweight and have one or more of the additional risk factors for diabetes listed below. In those without these risk factors, testing should begin at age 45.

-Being overweight
-Physical inactivity
-Family history: A parent or sibling has type 2 diabetes.
-Race: If you are African-American, Hispanic, American Indian or Asian-American.
-Gave birth to a baby weighing more than 9 pounds or been diagnosed with gestational diabetes while pregnant
-High blood pressure—140/90 mmH
Type 1 diabetes can’t be prevented. However, a healthy lifestyle can help prevent type 2 diabetes. Small changes can lead to better health.

Regular exercise: Aim for 30 minutes of moderate physical activity a day. Take a brisk daily walk, ride your bike or swim laps. Workouts can be broken up into smaller sessions spread throughout the day.

Healthy eating: Choose foods low in fat and calories. Focus on fruits, vegetables and whole grains and watch your portions.

Lose excess weight: A 5-7 percent loss of body weight (about 10-14 pounds for a person weighing 200 pounds), can reduce the risk of diabetes for someone who is overweight.

Check out our website for more resources and information about Diabetes.

Check out our newest app for eating healthy

If you’re looking for a fun way to motivate yourself to eat more fruits and vegetables, look no further than the Half My Plate app, which is a customizable tracker that helps you reach your goals for a healthy diet by inspiring you make half your plate fruits and vegetables. This app includes personalized fruit and vegetable recommended amounts and a searchable database of recipes that feature fruits and vegetables. Download with apple or android.

Plus, if you download the app now and email your physical address to gethealthy@snhdmail.org, we’ll mail you a free colander to help you wash all of your fruits and vegetables! (While supplies last). Your new get healthy colander will make washing your fruits and veggies even more exciting! Download the app and email us!

Patrol.Protect.Prepare.

This week marks the kick off of the annual “April Pools Day” drowning prevention awareness campaign. The focus of this campaign is to promote drowning prevention during the spring and summer months when swimming pools are in highest use in the Las Vegas Valley.

As part of this year’s event, the Southern Nevada Health District in cooperation with agencies and the Drowning Prevention Coalition unveiled a new outreach campaign that reminds the public to always keep these key steps in mind to prevent drownings:

1.Patrol – Always designate an adult Water Watcher to actively watch children in the water, including pools, bathtubs, or other bodies of water.

2.Protect – Install barriers between your home and pool to ensure safety including fences, door alarms, locks and spa safety covers. Lock doggie doors children can’t crawl through them.

3.Prepare – Create a water safety plan for your family. Enroll children in swimming lessons, take adult CPR classes, and be sure to equip your pool with proper safety equipment including life jackets, personal floatation devices and rescue tools. If an emergency happens, have a telephone nearby to call 9-1-1.

Drowning is the leading cause of injury-related death among Clark County children aged 1-4 years. With more than 100,000 residential swimming pools and 5,000 public pools in Clark County the drowning risk for young children is ever present.

As part of the new rebranded drowning prevention campaign, Child Drowning Prevention Coalition members are encouraging all adults to take a pledge to be a Water Watcher every time children in their care are in or near water, and when children are under the supervision of other adults, to ask those parents about their Water Watcher plans.

Pledge cards will be distributed in English and Spanish at outreach events in the community and available at www.GetHealthyClarkCounty.org to be printed out. Photos and video of the public taking the pledge and supporting the effort can be shared on Facebook using the hashtags #NVWaterWatchers and #PoolSafely. The Health District also has Water Watcher lanyards that are available while supplies last for adults who take the pledge.

Visit the Get Healthy Clark County website for more information about the “Be a Water Watcher” pledge effort, a partnership with the national Pool Safely campaign sponsored by the U.S. Consumer Products Safety Commission. 

Eating Healthy on a Budget

Getting the most nutrition for your food budget starts with a little extra planning before you shop. There are many ways to save money on the foods that you eat. The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics have some budget-friendly tips for eating right.

Plan what you’re going to eat. Before you head for the grocery store, plan your meals and snacks for the week. Review recipes for what ingredients are needed. Check to see what foods you already have and make a list of what you need to buy. When you shop with a list, you will be less likely to buy extra items that are not on it.

Decide how much to make. Making a large batch by doubling a recipe will save time in the kitchen later on. Extra portions can be used for lunches or meals later in the week, or freeze leftovers in individual containers for future use. Plus, foods purchased in bulk are almost always cheaper.

Shop for foods that are in season. Fresh fruits and vegetables that are in season are usually easier to get and may be a lot less expensive. Your local farmer’s market is also a great source of seasonal produce. Just remember that some fresh fruits and vegetables don’t last long. Buy small amounts at a time to avoid having to throw away spoiled produce.

Try canned or frozen produce. At certain times of the year, frozen and canned fruits and vegetables may be less expensive than fresh. For canned items, choose fruit canned in 100% fruit juice and vegetables with “low sodium” or “no salt added” on the label.

Cook more, eat out less. Many foods prepared at home are cheaper and more nutritious. Also, convenience foods like frozen dinners, pre-cut vegetables and instant rice or oatmeal will cost you more than if you make them from scratch. Go back to basics and find a few simple and healthy recipes that your family enjoys.

Watch portion sizes. Eating too much of even lower cost foods and beverages can add up to extra dollars and calories. Use smaller plates, bowls and glasses to help keep portions under control. Fill half your plate with fruits and vegetables and the other half with whole grains and lean meat, poultry, seafood or beans. This is an easy way to eat a balanced meal while controlling portions and cost. To complete the meal, add a glass of fat-free or low-fat milk or a serving of fat-free yogurt for dessert.

Make your own healthy snacks. Convenience costs money, so many snacks, even healthy ones, usually cost more when sold individually. Make your own snacks by purchasing large tubs of low-fat yogurt or cottage cheese and dividing them into one cup containers. For trail mix, combine nuts, dried fruit and whole grain pretzels or cereal; store small portions in airtight containers. Air-popped popcorn and whole fresh fruits in season also tend to cost less compared to prepackaged items.

Healthy Recipe Ideas

Looking for some fresh new ideas to jumpstart your healthy meal planning? Check out these resources for some new recipes to help you eat more fruits and veggies.

Get Healthy Recipes

Flavors of the Heart Cookbook

More Matters Recipes

Fruits and vegetables are part of a well-balanced and healthy eating plan. Helping control your weight is not the only benefit of eating more fruits and vegetables. Diets rich in fruits and vegetables may reduce the risk of some types of cancer and other chronic diseases. Fruits and vegetables also provide essential vitamins and minerals, fiber, and other substances that are important for good health. The more you can incorporate them into your cooking, the easier it will be to eat them. You can create lower-calorie versions of some of your favorite dishes by substituting low-calorie fruits and vegetables in place of higher-calorie ingredients. The water and fiber in fruits and vegetables will add volume to your dishes, so you can eat the same amount of food with fewer calories. And you will leave feeling full after your meal!

Put Your best fork forward

The Get Healthy team is encouraging everyone to “Put Your Best Fork Forward” for National Nutrition Month.  The annual observance was created by the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics and serves as a reminder that every bite counts. In addition to inspiring everyone to take small steps to improve their healthy eating habits – one forkful at a time – this month is also a time to encourage people to incorporate more physical activities into their daily routines. For moderately active adults, the recommended daily amount of fruit is 2 cups each day and 2 ½ half cups of vegetables. This is a great time to download many of our resources to help you develop healthier eating habits and eat the recommended of fruits and veggies.  We have several free nutrition related mobile apps and resources to make eating healthier fun and easier.

Half My Plate mobile app helps you eat a healthy diet and track how many servings of fruit and vegetables you are consuming each day.

SNAP Cooking app to allows users to search for healthy recipes based on ingredients or by recipe name. Users can also bookmark their favorites and create a shopping list. Those using federal SNAP benefits can use a feature that enables them to enter their ZIP code to locate SNAP retailers in their area.

Sugar Savvy Beverage app tells users how much sugar is in the beverages they are consuming.

The Nutrition Challenge is a free 8-week online program will help you increase the number of fruits and vegetables you eat each day.

And don’t forget about our mobile apps that promote being active. Check out the Walk Around Nevada and Neon to Nature and get moving in our great city! Download free from iTunes and Google Play.