Patrol. Protect. Prepare. Become a Water Watcher!

May is National Water Safety month and we are here to help keep you and your children safe! In April, SNHD released our new drowning prevention campaign, “Be a Water Watcher”.  This encourages adults to be vigilant and always designate a water watcher when children are in or around water.  Being a water watcher means focusing on the three P’s, “Patrol, Protect, and Prepare”.  The data shows that the number one preventative measure is constant supervision which lands under, “Patrol”.

-Always designate an adult to actively watch children in the water.
-Most tragedies occur in seconds, the time it takes to answer your phone.
-Do not drink alcohol while supervising children in and around water.

When it comes to pool safety there are many layers of protection that should always be implemented.  Designating a water watcher is just one of those layers. Click on the American Red Cross link to see other layers of protection that can help save a child’s life!

Be sugar savy this summer! Drink more water.

What are sugar-sweetened beverages (SSBs)? Sugar-sweetened beverages are beverages that contain added sugars and include popular drinks such as:

• Soft drinks/soda pop/ soda
• Fruit drinks, punches, or “-ades”
• Sports drinks
• Tea and Coffee drinks
• Energy drinks
• Sweetened/Flavored milks

What’s the problem with sugar-sweetened beverages?

• Sugar-sweetened beverages (SSBs) including non-diet sodas, energy drinks, and fruit drinks have been associated with obesity, and obesity-related illnesses.
• Nevada has the second highest prevalence of fruit drink consumption among persons aged 18-34 years and is the highest prevalence of African-Americans and     Hispanics who consume fruit-drinks on a regular basis.
• Children and adolescents are major consumers of sugar-sweetened beverages and this consumption has been associated with the rising levels of childhood      obesity.
• Calories from liquid beverages contribute to weight gain at higher levels than solids foods do, and also lack comparable nutrient content when compared to     calories consumed from solid foods.
• Sugar-sweetened beverages are the largest source of added sugar to the American diet.
• Several health conditions have been linked to consumption of excess SSB’s including diabetes, dental carries, and cardiovascular disease.

Healthy Alternatives:

• Water: Try water infused with added citrus or sliced cucumbers.
• 100% Vegetable Juice: Packed with flavor; high in vitamins C, A, and potassium and around 50 calories per cup. If possible choose the low sodium versions.
• Non-fat or low-fat milk: High in calcium and protein—and you need both. You could also try soy milk, rice milk or almond milk.
• Light yogurt and fruit smoothie: Creamy and sweet, high in calcium and only about 170 calories per cup.
• Tea, unsweetened: Get a boost on less than five calories per cup, plus it’s high in antioxidants

For more information concerning sugar-sweetened beverages & to find other delicious drink recipes, please visit our website at: http://www.gethealthyclarkcounty.org/eat-better/sugar-sweetened-beverages.php

May is National Stroke Awareness Month

A stroke can happen to anyone, at any time, at any age. It is important to know what the symptoms are and what to do if you spot them. A stroke occurs when blood flow to an area of the brain is restricted because it is blocked by a clot. The brain cells deprived of blood flow begin to die because there is no oxygen and nutrients to the area needed to survive.
There are two types of stroke. The most common type of stroke, called ischemic, is caused by a blood clot that blocks or plugs a blood vessel in the brain.  The second type of stroke, called hemorrhagic, occurs when a blood vessel in the brain ruptures. Hemorrhagic stroke is commonly caused by high blood pressure and brain aneurysms.
Use the letters FAST to spot stroke signs and know when to call 911.
F – Face Drooping. Is one side of the face drooping or feel numb?
A – Arm weakness. Does the suddenly drift downward on one side of the body?
S – Speech. Trouble speaking or slurred speech? Unable to speak or hard to understand?
T – Time counts. Notice any of these warning signs? If so, call 9-1-1 immediately, even if the symptoms go away.

Unsure if it’s a stroke?? Call 911 anyway! Don’t wait! Sometimes other symptoms, beyond FAST appear like, numbness, confusion, trouble seeing or walking and severe headache.
 
Want to learn more about stroke?
•Talk to your healthcare provider about your personal risk factor for having a stroke.
•If you or someone you know is a stroke survivor, local support groups are available.

Check out these support groups and educational groups in our local area:

Mountain View Hospital
Diagnosis, treatment, education and outreach
Program serves patients, caregivers, and families
When: First Tuesday of every month from 2:00pm-3:00pm
Location: Mountain View H2U Office Suite 114
For more information, call (702) 233-5474

Spring Valley Hospital
Learn about life after a stroke from survivors and experts.
When: Third Friday of each month from 11 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.
Location: Use the main entrance of the hospital and follow the signage for the Stroke Support Group
For more information, call 702-853-3162.

Did you Know?
•Stroke is the fourth leading cause of death and disability nationwide and fifth in Nevada.
•On average, every 40 seconds someone in the United States has a stroke.
•Stroke can happen to anyone, at any age. An estimated, 80% of strokes are preventable by taking small steps to reduce personal risk.
•The risk of having a stroke increases each decade in people over the age of 55.
•To reduce your risk for stroke make simple lifestyle changes by; maintain a healthy diet, manage blood pressure, maintain a healthy weight, get physically active, lower cholesterol, reduce blood sugar and don’t smoke.
•Stroke is treatable. If you or someone you know was having a stroke.

Be a Water Watcher-PATROL

May is National Water Safety month and we are here to help keep you and your children safe! In April, SNHD released our new drowning prevention campaign, “Be a Water Watcher”.  This encourages adults to be vigilant and always designate a water watcher when children are in or around water.  Being a water watcher means focusing on the three P’s, “Patrol, Protect, and Prepare”.  The data shows that the number one preventative measure is constant supervision which lands under, “Patrol”.

-Always designate an adult to actively watch children in the water.
-Most tragedies occur in seconds, the time it takes to answer your phone.
-Do not drink alcohol while supervising children in and around water.

When it comes to pool safety there are many layers of protection that should always be implemented.  Designating a water watcher is just one of those layers. Click on the American Red Cross to see other layers of protection that can help save a child’s life!