I’ve run 5Ks, do you have a training program for a longer distance?

12-week training program for a 10K (6.2 miles)
Here is a 12-week program to get you fit enough to tackle a 10K race.  This program assumes that you can walk at a brisk pace for at least 60 minutes.  Stick with the program and don’t try to do more than is listed each week, even if you feel you can.  On the other hand, if you find the program too strenuous, just stretch it out a little and give your body more time to adapt.  Remember that a little soreness is normal, pain is not.  Be sure to check with your doctor first if you have any concerns or pre-existing medical conditions.  Be sure to properly warm up and cool down before and after each training session.
Follow this schedule every other day, for a total of three days a week:
Week 1:  Walk 3 days; one 30-minute walk, followed by one 40 minute walk, and then a 60 minute walk.  Pick up the pace, pump your arms and break a sweat!
Week 2:  Walk 10 minutes.  Then jog for 2 minutes and walk for 1 minute.  Repeat the jog/walk interval 5 times.  Walk 10 minutes to finish.
Week 3:  Walk 8 minutes followed by jogging for 3 minutes.  Repeat 4 times.
Week 4:  Walk 6 minutes then jog for 4 minutes.  Repeat 5 times.
Week 5:  Walk for 6 minutes then jog for 5 minutes.  Repeat 5 times.
Week 6:  Walk for 3 minutes then jog for 7 minutes.  Repeat 5 times.
Week 7:  Walk for 2 minutes then jog for 9 minutes.  Repeat 5 times.
Week 8:  Walk for 1 minute then jog for 12 minutes.  Repeat 5 times.
Week 9:  Walk for 1 minute then jog for 14 minutes.  Repeat 4 times.
Week 10:  Walk for 1 minute then jog for 20 minutes.  Repeat 3 times.
Week 11:  Walk for 1 minute then jog for 30 minutes.  Repeat 2 times.
Week 12: RACE WEEK:  Run 1 day for 30 minutes, the next day for 20 minutes and your 10K Race on day three.  Congratulations!

 

I want to run a 5k, how do I start?

From the couch to a 5K Race (3.1 miles) Here is an 8-week program to get you from the couch to the finish line of a 5K race.  This program will ease you into running gradually until you can jog for 30 consecutive minutes.  You should have a fairly good fitness base to start – be able to walk briskly for 30 minutes at a time.  You may feel tempted to skip ahead in the program, or do more than is listed each week.  Try to resist this temptation, as it could lead to burn out or injury.  On the other hand, if you feel the workouts are too strenuous, just stretch it out.  Don’t progress faster than you think you are able - repeat weeks if necessary and move ahead to the next week only when you feel ready.  Finally, don’t worry about how fast you are running.  For now, focus on gradually increasing the time that you run.

 Remember that a little soreness is normal, pain is not.  Be sure to check with your doctor first if you have any concerns or pre-existing medical conditions.  Start each session with a brisk 5 minute warm up walk and remember to cool down after each training session.Schedule your workouts (3-4 per week) with one day of rest in between.

Week 1:  Warm up; walk for 6 minutes then jog for 1 minute.  Repeat the interval 3 times.  Cool down.  Do a total of 3 workouts this week.

Week 2:  Warm up; walk for 5 minutes then jog for 2 minutes.  Repeat the interval 3 times. Cool down.  Do a total of 3 workouts this week.

Week 3:  Warm up; walk for 3 minutes then jog for 4 minutes.  Repeat the interval 4 times.  Cool down.  Do a total of 4 workouts this week.

Week 4:  Warm up; walk for 2 minutes then jog for 5 minutes.  Repeat the interval 4 times. Cool down.  Do a total of 4 workouts this week.

Week 5:  Warm up; walk for 2 minutes then jog for 8 minutes.  Repeat the interval 3 times. Cool down.  Do a total of 4 workouts this week.

Week 6:  Warm up; walk for 2 minutes then jog for 9 minutes.  Repeat the interval 3 times.  Do a total of 4 workouts this week.

Week 7:  Warm up; walk for 1 minute then jog for 11 minutes.  Repeat the interval 3 times.  Do a total of 4 workouts this week.

Week 8:  For your first run, walk for 5 minutes, then jog for 20 minutes and cool down.  For your second run, walk for 5 minutes, then jog for 25 minutes and cool down.  For your third run, walk for 5 minutes, jog for 30 minutes and cool down.  Congratulations!

-Get Healthy Staff

Is it cheaper to eat fast food than healthy food?

No! There seems to be a common misconception that fast food is cheaper than healthy food- but that isn’t necessarily the case.  You can plan a healthy meal without sacrificing the principle of thrift. Below is a comparison of a typical fast food meal and a meal prepared at home keeping nutrition recommendations in mind.

Breakfast:

Typical Fast Food

Cost
Calories
  Healthy
Cost
Calories
Egg McMuffin
$2.39
300
  Oatmeal
 
24¢
295
Hash Brown
$1.09
150
  Milk
 
21¢
180
Medium Orange Juice
$1.79
180
  Banana
29¢
100
Total:
$5.87
630
    

 

Total:
74¢
575

Lunch:

Typical Fast Food

Cost
Calories
  Healthy
Cost
Calories
Extra Value Meal
$4.69
    Peanut Butter Sandwich
   
Big Mac
  540
  Whole Wheat Bread
50¢
90
Medium Fries
  380
  Peanut Butter
26¢
175
Medium Soda
  210
  Strawberry Jam

50
        Carrots

25
        Apple
25¢
70
Total:
$4.69
1130
    

 

Total:
$2.18
410

Dinner:

Typical Fast Food

Cost
Calories
  Healthy
Cost
Calories
Extra Value Meal
$4.69
    Chicken Stir Fry
   
Quarter pounder with cheese
  510
  Boneless Skinless Chicken Breast
$1.03
150
Medium Fries
  380
  Frozen Vegetables
$1.26
60
Medium Soda
  210
  Brown Rice
20¢
215
        Stir Fry Marinade
50¢
70
Total:
$4.69
1100
    

 

Total:
$2.99
495

 

-Get Healthy Staff

Running: A beginners insight. Part one.

About 8 months ago I was asked if I wanted to run in a 5K.  At first I laughed, I was not a runner, and frankly the thought of running for 3.2 miles did not sound fun at all.  My friend kept pestering me, it was for a good cause and  finally I agreed. And I am so glad that I did!  I have since come to like running, I love how I feel after a run, and I have just signed up for my first half marathon.  If you’ve decided to take up running as a means to begin exercising or as an addition to your current exercise regimen, or maybe you signed up for a race or someone else decided that you will start running, you’ve completed the first step to becoming a runner.  Here are some things to remember as you start running.
Overcome mental hurdles. Mental hurdles can be more overwhelming than physical ones. Fears about being too out of shape, too slow, or not looking like a runner–are the hardest part of getting started. When I ran my 5K I feared that I would be the last person to finish, I wasn’t, but it would not have mattered if I was.  The crowd cheered just as loud for the last person as they did for me and everyone else. It doesn’t matter how long it takes you or what you look like, the important thing is that you did it!  If you have doubts, stand along the sidelines of any local 5K and observe the wide range of people who participate. You’ll see teenagers and grandmothers, sizes petite to plus and people running at all different speeds.
 Buy the right shoes. Nothing is worse than going on a run in the wrong shoes. You will wake up the next day hurting, I have been there!  Search out a shoe that fits you properly. If you’re not sure which shoe will work best for you, shop at a running-specialty store. After you buy your shoes, remember that even the best have a limited lifespan. It is recommended that you replace them after about 350 to 500 miles of wear.
 Don’t hesitate to walk. Walk is not a four-letter word, it is your friend! Pausing to walk during a run is not cheating. It breaks a big run into smaller pieces, making it more doable. I often would set landmarks that I would run too, and then when I reached them, I would walk for a little while!  There were times when a stranger’s mailbox was my best friend, because once I reached it I got to walk!
Start slowly.  If you can work up to running one mile you can work up to running 12. Gradually increase the duration, frequency, and intensity of the exercise. This allows your body time to make the physical adaptations necessary to meet the demands of the exercise. Extend your exercise time gradually by adding a few minutes each week. As your fitness improves and running becomes easier, extend your run interval while keeping the walk interval. As you become more and more fit, you can opt to reduce or eliminate the walk break.

Do remember you’re a winner.   One of the great beauties of running is that it gives everyone a chance to win. Winning isn’t automatic; you still have to work for success and risk failure. But in running, unlike in other sports, there’s no need to beat an opponent or an arbitrary standard (such as “par” in golf). Runners measure themselves against their own standards. When you improve a time, or increase a distance, set a personal record, or finish a race, you win–no matter what anyone else has done on the same day.

Look for next week’s blog post and we will give you a plan for running your first 5k!!
-Amanda Reichert, M.Ed., CHES